Rigby & Peller ‘deeply saddened’ by royal warrant loss

Rigby & Peller founder June Kenton started fitting the Queen in 1960.Rigby & Peller founder June Kenton started fitting the Queen in 1960.

Rigby & Peller has reacted to the news that it has lost its royal warrant to supply lingerie to the Queen.

It was confirmed yesterday that the retailer had its coveted title removed last year after its founder June Kenton, who had fit the Queen for 57 years, wrote a memoir about her time at Buckingham Palace.

In a statement sent to Lingerie Insight, Rigby & Peller said: “The Royal Household Warrants Committee has decided to cancel the Royal Warrant granted to Rigby & Peller and Mrs June Kenton.

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“Rigby & Peller is deeply saddened by this decision and is not able to elaborate further on the cancellation out of respect for her Majesty the Queen and the Royal Warrant Holders Association. However, the company will continue to provide an exemplary and discreet service to its clients.”

Kenton received a letter from the Lord Chamberlain last year stating that Rigby & Peller was to lose its royal warrant as a result of her biography, Storm in a D Cup.

In the book, she wrote about fitting the Queen, explaining that her corgis were often present.

She also wrote about Princess Diana, saying she would accept posters showing models in lingerie and swimwear to give to princes William and Harry to display in their Eton dorms.

But in an interview with the BBC, she denied going into detail about palace fittings.

“I’ve never, ever spoken about a customer, any customer who I fit in the fitting room, let alone the Queen,” she said.

“I just mentioned all about the conversation that we had because she was as nervous as I was, or maybe not as much as I was. And she put me at my east and she was just wonderful.”

When asked whether Buckingham Palace has over-reacted to the autobiography, she said: “Well I think so, obviously, because I’ve never spoken about a customer when she’s come out of the fitting room. So maybe I was the Lord Chamberlain, not Buckingham Palace. I don’t know.”

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